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Boeing 737 MAX issue which produced crashes is seriously investigated

A new U.S. Senate investigation has launched on Tuesday, about how the safety inspectors who reviewed the Boeing 737 MAX for certification were trained.

A potential lack of training is presumed. That Senate investigation is one of several into the FAA and Boeing following two fatal MAX accidents since October. Things are not easy to be clarified. Pilots flying Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 initially followed emergency procedures that were laid out by Boeing before the plane nose-dived into the ground, according to  preliminary findings. But despite following that, pilots could not regain control of the Boeing 737 MAX 8. The findings are not final and subject to change as the investigation continues.

BoeingMAX-at-the-factory
A Boeing 737MAX in the factory

In the Lion Air crash, the MCAS automated system also forced the plane's nose down more than 24 times before it finally hit water. It was found tnat the flight simulator that pilots trained on to learn how to fly the Boeing 737 Max 8 plane did not replicate the MCAS automated feature that crash investigators are scrutinizing. Boeing has $50 billion worth of orders for the 737 MAX but the global fleet was grounded until the suspected cause of crashes is identified and fixed.

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