Headlines:

New advanced research in nanotechnology, based on diamond study

By beaming an electric field at diamond nanoneedles just 20 nanometres in length (about 10,000 time smaller than a human hair), the researchers were able to get them to bend to 90 degrees without fracturing.

The process is reversible, too. "These are very important insights into the dynamics of how nanostructured materials distort and bend, and how altering the parameters of a nanostructure can alter any of its physical properties from mechanical to magnetic to optical," said physicist Igor Aharonovich from UTS. The researchers from the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) in Australia also observed a new type of plastic deformation, where the needles didn't bend back. They also described a new type of plastic deformation.

diamonds-under-pressure
Experiment on diamonds

Getting cuts of diamond down to this size isn't easy at the moment, but could have many potential uses in the future. Many applications to be achieved in advanced studies are possible. "These are very important insights into the dynamics of how nanostructured materials distort and bend, and how altering the parameters of a nanostructure can alter any of its physical properties from mechanical to magnetic to optical," says physicist Igor Aharonovich from UTS.

Comments