Scientists created a 3-D printed bioprosthetic ovary successfully tested into female mice

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This technique will possibly be used in the future in humans, to restore fertility and hormone function in cancer survivors or to  offer options for women who have a condition called primary ovarian insufficiency, but much more experimentation will be necessary continuing studies over several years before the technique can be fully adapted. “A successful human bioprosthetic could have a wide range of applications,” said Dr. Monica Loranda, researcher at Northwestern University, the lead author of the study published now in Nature Communications. The 3-D printed bioprosthetic ovary, as it’s termed, is “the holy grail of bioengineering for regenerative medicine,” said Teresa K. Woodruff, a reproductive scientist and director of the Women’s Health Research Institute at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

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