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The first vaccine against dengue fever can be dangerous, a study found

An estimated 400 million people globally are infected each year with dengue fever, a mosquito-borne virus found most often in tropical regions. Most suffer relatively mild symptoms, including fever, but more than 2 million people each year develop a severe hemorrhagic case of the disease, which can be fatal.

As a common fact, dengue is more severe the second time a person gets infected and that is why about 25,000 people a year die as a result of the infection. To make a vaccine available for dengue fever was a achieved goal by French pharmaceutical giant Sanofi Pasteur, which produced Dengvaxia. The vaccine reduced the number of infections by 60 percent and hospitalizations by 80 percent. But a bad news was issued  now: a study found it could make the disease worse in people who had not previously been infected with the virus. Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, Imperial College London and the University of Florida analyzed data from all of the vaccine trials, involving more than 30,000 people in 10 countries, with long-term follow-up of the participants, and determined the vaccine acts as a silent, first infection in some people. So a new, second infection, after vaccination, could be even fatale in those cases.

vaccination-for-dengue-fever-in Philippines
Vaccination against Dengue fever in Philippines

The World Health Organization issued a warning not to give the vaccine to anyone younger than 9. Regulators in several countries, including Brazil, Mexico, Costa Rica, Paraguay and the Philippines, have approved Dengvaxia. Now, in the Philippines, The Government suspended a school-based immunization programme following the revelations, but this is after 733,000 children received vaccine. This is why "the Department of Health is prepared for a worst-case scenario," a spokesman said to media.Here and in other many cases worldwide a tragedy can occur.

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