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Drop The Fear Of Addiction

As we know Morphine relieves deep sore pain but it does no action on fast pain those results from an injury. The dreadful side effect of this analgesic action we all know is that the consumer or the patient repeatedly gets a feeling of disconnection from the world, along with ecstasy and occasionally, delight.

This is the reason why morphine is so popular among the ones who like to abuse drugs for recreational purposes. These drugs are extremely addictive, and the body quickly gets used to their use and therefore large dosages are necessary for the same effect later on. The most ominous derivative of morphine is the killer, heroin. Heroine is roughly 1.5 to 2 times more powerful than morphine.

According to a research released on this Wednesday, which could establish a major advancement in treating the addicts, here comes a ray of hope. Addiction to heroin and morphine can be controlled.

Researchers at the University of Adelaide, Australia worked together with their colleagues at the University of Colorado, United States to identify a key or crucial mechanism in the our body's immune system that helps intensify such addiction to opium drugs.

They informed that their research work have shown convincingly that addiction can be blocked through the immune system of our brain, without affecting the brain or neurons.

It has been proven and observed that our immune system and the central nervous system play significant roles in amplifying and creating addiction.  But what is new is that carvings for opium drugs can be controlled and prevented by blocking the immune reaction or response in our brain.

The result that is supposed to be published today in the Journal of Neuroscience, disclose that laboratory research results have showed that the medicine known as plus-naloxone, which is not in clinical use up till now, will selectively obstruct the immune-addiction reaction or response.

The researchers informed that opium drugs such as heroin and morphine attach to the immune receptors in the brain and then act as amplifiers for craving, ramping up addiction. But this new drug would automatically shut this effect down. It actually diminishes this effect.

Linda Watkins who is a professor at the Center for Neuroscience at the University of Colorado disclosed that the study essentially changed the understanding about opium and opium drugs, their helpfulness and their addiction and side effects.

This new drug could be co-formulated with morphine and could allow patients to relieve their pain. And they could consume it without the fear of addiction.

Hutchinson said this new drug that is in its way can help people with their addiction and will be a complete breakthrough in the drug abuse scenario.

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