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Chicago blues guitarist Otis Rush died

Legendary Chicago blues guitarist Otis Rush, known as „king of the hill” died Saturday at the age of 84. He succumbed to complications from a stroke he suffered in 2003.

"He was one of the last great blues guitar heroes. He was an electric God," said Gregg Parker, CEO and a founder of the Chicago Blues Museum. Rush catapulted to international fame in 1956 with his first recording on Cobra Records of "I Can't Quit You Baby," which reached No. 6 on the Billboard R&B charts. He loved to play to live audiences, from small clubs on the West Side of Chicago to sold out venues in Europe and Japan and hi had a particular behavior: "He preferred to go out and play and go back and sleep in his own bed. He was not a show business guy," his longtime manager Rick Bates said.

Rush-after-receiving-Grammy-award
Otis Rush after he won the Grammy

Rush influenced artists from Carlos Santana and Eric Clapton to the rock band Led Zeppelin. He was a key architect of the Chicago “West Side Sound” in the 1950s and 1960s, which modernised traditional blues to introduce more of a jazzy, amplified sound. He won a Grammy for Best Traditional Blues Recording in 1999 for "Any Place I'm Going," and was inducted into the Blues Foundation Hall of Fame in 1984. Rush was well-known for wearing a cowboy hat when he performed. He was left-handed, using his right hand to fret. The artist had eight children and numerous grand- and great grandchildren.

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